How to...

Find resources

Short guide to locating resources in ProjectEVOLVE using open search; strand; phase (age group) or theme.

(Click on "YouTube" icon for a larger version).

Use resources

Short guide on how to use different ProjectEVOLVE resources live on-screen or download for later.

(Click on "YouTube" icon for a larger version).

Make your own custom plans

Using the PDF export button in ProjectEVOLVE to select the content you need.

(Click on "YouTube" icon for a larger version).

Combined Statements for Mapping

As you may be aware, we have combined statements from "Education for a Connected World" under a single resource(s) where the differentiation between statements is very close. Each resource is geared to cover all concepts within combined statements.

To assist with curriculum mapping, these are the statements we have combined so far. (Health WellBeing and Lifestyle has a resource for each statement)

Download a WORD.docx version of this table

Self-image and identity

41 statements total

25 combined 

EYFS-7

7-11

11-14

14-18

  • I can recognise that I can say ‘no’ / ‘please stop’ / ‘I’ll tell’ / ‘I’ll ask’ to somebody who asks me to do something that makes me feel sad, embarrassed or upset.

  • I can explain how this could be either in real life or online.

  • I can explain what is meant by the term ‘identity’.

  • I can explain how I can represent myself in different ways online.

  • I can explain ways in which and why I might change my identity depending on what I am doing online (e.g. gaming; using an avatar; social media).

  • I can give examples of how the internet and social media can be used for positive self-promotion.

  • I can explain how people can curate and experiment with their identity online and why they might wish to do this.

  • I can explain how online content can influence the way that people behave; I can evaluate different factors and their impact.

  • I can explain how online content can be shaped to influence behaviour and body image (e.g. fashion, pornography, lifestyle sites).

  • I can give examples of media which are designed to influence behaviour.

  • I can recognise that there may be people online who could make me feel sad, embarrassed or upset.

  • If something happens that makes me feel sad, worried, uncomfortable or frightened I can give examples of when and how to speak to an adult I can trust.

  • I can explain how my online identity can be different to the identity I present in ‘real life’.

  • Knowing this, I can describe the right decisions about how I interact with others and how others perceive me.

I am aware that my own personal online activity, history or profile (my ‘digital personality’) will affect the type of information returned to me in a search or on a social media stream, and intended to influence my beliefs, actions and choices.

I can explain what is meant by artificial intelligence (AI); I can assess how AI may affect my present and future life (including my career choices).

  • I can explain how other people’s identity online can be different to their identity in real life.

  • I can describe ways in which people might make themselves look different online.

I can explain how identity online can be copied, modified or altered.

I can reflect on and assess the role that digital media plays in my life and give clear examples of where it benefits my lifestyle.

I can demonstrate ways I can use the internet and social media for positive self-promotion including enhancing employment prospects.

I can give examples of issues online that might make me feel sad, worried, uncomfortable or frightened; I can give examples of how I might get help.

I can demonstrate responsible choices about my online identity, depending on context.

  • I can explain how presenting myself in different ways online carries both benefits and risks

  • I can explain strategies to reduce potential risks.

I can recognise, assess and if necessary, challenge the social norms and expectations that influence how I represent myself online (e.g. profile pictures, shared content) and how it might differ according to gender, culture or social group.

4 statements 

  • I can describe ways in which media can shape ideas about gender.

  • I can identify messages about gender roles and make judgements based on them.

  • I can challenge and explain why it is important to reject inappropriate messages about gender online.

  • I can explain how online images can help to reinforce stereotypes.

  • I can explain how personal images can be photo-manipulated.

  • I know how to appropriately challenge negative comments or expectations concerning my online identity.

  • I make positive contributions to other’s self-identity, where appropriate (e.g. avoiding negative comments or positive commentary on profile pictures).

  • I can describe issues online that might make me or others feel sad, worried, uncomfortable or frightened. I know and can give examples of how I might get help, both on and offline.

  • I can explain why I should keep asking until I get the help I need.

I can describe some of the pressures that people can feel when they are using social media (e.g. peer pressure, a desire for peer approval, ‘FOMO’).

I can describe the laws governing online sexual content.

6 statements 

6 statements

I can describe and critically assess ways in which viewing online sexual content can influence expectations and behaviour in relationships; I can assess how unrealistic or unreciprocated expectations could damage a relationship or be abusive.

I can identify online role models who manage a positive identity and give examples from my own research/experience to support my understanding.

  • I can describe and assess the creative benefits and ethical drawbacks of digital manipulation.

  • I can explain and assess the importance of purpose and context in evaluating digitally edited personal images.

9 statements

Online relationships

46 statements total

29 combined 

EYFS-7

7-11

11-14

14-18

  • I can recognise some ways in which the internet can be used to communicate.

  • I can give examples of how I (might) use technology to communicate with people I know.

  • I can describe ways people who have similar likes and interests can get together online.

  • I can give examples of technology specific platforms of communication (e.g. emojis, acronyms, text speak).

  • I can explain some risks of communicating online with others I don’t know well.

  • I can explain how and why people who I communicate with online may try to influence others negatively and can offer examples. e.g. grooming; radicalisation; coercion.

  • I can describe the initial signs of potentially problematic situations e.g. grooming, cyberbullying.

  • I can describe how online technology allows access to and communication with culturally diverse communities beyond my immediate social group.

  • I can give examples of how I adapt my behaviour to engage positively with those groups taking into account gender, cultural sensitivity, political and religious beliefs etc.

I can use the internet with adult support to communicate with people I know.

  • I can explain how my and other people’s feelings can be hurt by what is said or written online.

  • I can explain strategies for assessing the degree of trust I place in people or organisations online.

  • I can assess when I need to take action and explain what to do if I am concerned about an online relationship.

I can assess when the use of technology has become controlling (e.g. using location apps to monitor and manipulate). I can explain why this is abuse, what I would say and do, and how I could get support.

I can explain why it is important to be considerate and kind to people online.

  • I can explain why I should be careful who I trust online and what information I can trust them with.

  • I can explain why I can take back my trust in someone or something if I feel nervous, uncomfortable or worried.

I can describe the benefits of communicating with a partner online.

  • I can describe the laws that govern online behaviour and how they inform what is acceptable or legal (e.g. sexting (and related terminology), trolling, harassment, stalking).

  • can give examples from my own media research of historical cases to support my understanding.

  • I can use the internet to communicate with people I don’t know well (e.g. email a penpal in another school/ country).

  • I can give examples of how I might use technology to communicate with others I don’t know well.

  • I can explain what it means to ‘know someone’ online and why this might be different from knowing someone in real life.

  • I can explain what is meant by ‘trusting someone online’. I can explain why this is different from ‘liking someone online’.

I can explain how relationships can safely begin (on-line dating), develop, be maintained, change and end online.

I can describe actions I could take if I or someone else experiences or is targeted by illegal online behaviour.

4 statements 

  • I can describe strategies for 

  • safe and fun experiences in a range of online social environments.

  • I can give examples of how to make positive contributions to online debates and discussions.

  • I can give examples where positive contributions have effected change in an online community (e.g. Gamergate, gaming communities, social media).

  • I can explain how laws governing online behaviour vary depending on country and culture.

  • I can give examples from my own media research/ experience to support my understanding.

  • I can give examples of how to be respectful to others online.

  • I can identify the challenges raised by both unhealthy and healthy online sexual behaviour.

  • I can give examples of how harmful online sexual behaviour can occur and can critically assess the potential harm.

  • I can demonstrate strategies to gain help and report concerns for myself and others.

  • I can explain the difference between freedom of expression and legal accountabilities and can discuss appropriate balance between them.

  • I can give examples from my own media research/ experience to support my understanding.

  • I can explain that there are some people I communicate with online who may want to do me or my friends harm. I can recognise that this is not my/our fault.

I can explain what is meant by sharing explicit images, the different terms used for this, and a range of possible outcomes.

  • I can explain the term ‘whistleblowing’ and evaluate when such action may be appropriate or inappropriate.

  • I can give examples from my own media research/ experience to support my understanding.

  • I can make positive contributions and be part of online communities.

  • I can describe some of the communities in which I am involved and describe how I collaborate with others positively.

7 statements 

I can give examples of how I might mobilise online communities to support ideas/ projects or campaigns (e.g. crowdsourcing expertise for a project; developing a Kickstarter campaign to create social/financial support for an idea; amplifying political voice).

  • I can show I understand my responsibilities for the well-being of others in my online social group.

  • I can explain how impulsive and rash communications online may cause problems (e.g. flaming, content produced in live streaming).

8 statements

  • I can demonstrate how I would support others (including those who are having difficulties) online.

  • I can demonstrate ways of reporting problems online for both myself and my friends.

10 statements

Privacy and security

53 statements total

42  combined

EYFS-7

7-11

11-14

14-18

  • I can identify some simple examples of my personal information (e.g. name, address, birthday, age, location).

  • I can describe the people I can trust and can share this with; I can explain why I can trust them.

I can give reasons why I should only share information with people I choose to and can trust. I can explain that if I am not sure or I feel pressured, I should ask a trusted adult.

I can explain how and why it is important to always ensure I make safe and secure online payments.

I can undertake informed debate concerning the conflict between national security and personal privacy.

  • I can recognise more detailed examples of information that is personal to me (e.g. where I live, my family’s names, where I go to school).

  • I can explain why I should always ask a trusted adult before I share any information about myself online.

  • I understand and can give reasons why passwords are important.

  • I can describe simple strategies for creating and keeping passwords private.

I can explain that online services have terms and conditions that govern their use. I can give examples from some common online services that illustrate how they impact on a user and analyse these to make informed choices. 

  • I can describe how data drawn from users of online services can be used or sold to inform other services and organisations. I can give examples of this.

  • I can demonstrate additional ways to protect and manage data on my devices (e.g. “find my phone”; remote access; remote data deletion).

I can explain how passwords can be used to protect information and devices.

I can describe how connected devices can collect and share my information with others.

I can explain what malware is and give some examples of how it operates and what the impact could be on a device or user (e.g. viruses, trojans, ransomware).

I can explain how the security of data in a network can be compromised internally or externally and give examples of how this might occur (e.g. DDOS, proxy-bypass, distro, hacking). I can describe actions that can minimise risks.

  • I can describe how online information about me could be seen by others.

  • I can describe and explain some rules for keeping my information private.

  • I can explain what a strong password is.

  • I can describe strategies for keeping my personal information private, depending on context.

I can explain what cookies are and can give examples of how my online browsing can be tracked and used by others (e.g. adware).

I can explain why networks require secure management and can give examples of services that support this (e.g. firewalls, VPN, user monitoring).

I can explain what passwords are and can use passwords for my accounts and devices.

  • I can explain that others online can pretend to be me or other people, including my friends.

  • I can suggest reasons why they might do this.

I can identify commercial content and scams (e.g. pop-ups, spam) and can discuss simple strategies to manage such content (e.g. pop-up blockers, junk folders, unsubscribing).

I can explain the value of regular data backup in system recovery, and can give examples of and demonstrate effective practice in how this might be achieved (e.g. removable media, cloud).

I can explain how many devices in my home could be connected to the internet and can list some of those devices.

I can explain how internet use can be monitored.

I can explain how my internet use is often monitored (e.g. by my school or internet service provider).

  • I can describe key aspects of the law governing data use (e.g. DPA, GDPR) and, from my own media research, can give examples of those laws and their impact (e.g. RTBF, data breaches).

  • I can assess how those laws can vary depending on country and can give examples of some of the differences and issues they might raise.

I can create and use strong and secure passwords.

I can explain how to manage security software (e.g. anti-virus, security patches, adware blockers) on my devices and understand why regular updates are important. 

I can identify and assess when data needs to be transferred securely and can describe strategies to achieve this (e.g. encryption, secure services).

I can explain how many free apps or services may read and share my private information (e.g. friends, contacts, likes, images, videos, voice, messages, geolocation) with others.

I can demonstrate ways in which I can change my browser settings to make my online browsing more secure (e.g. cookie permissions, do-not-track-me, password storage, incognito).

I can describe how and where to report a personal data breach.

6 statements

I can explain how and why some apps may request or take payment for additional content (e.g. in-app purchases) and explain why I should seek permission from a trusted adult before purchasing.

I can explain app permissions and analyse them to make informed choices on which apps I use.

I can describe anonymous access services (e.g. TOR, Guerilla Mail, DuckDuckGo) and can give examples of how they may be used in both positive and negative contexts.

  • I use different passwords for a range of online services.

  • I can describe effective strategies for managing those passwords (e.g. password managers, acronyms, stories).

  • I know what to do if my password is lost or stolen.

I can explain how the security of devices connected to the internet may be compromised e.g. webcams, monitors, phones or toys - I can demonstrate actions I can take to minimise such compromise (e.g. covering cameras on computers when not in use).

I can explain the concepts ‘dark web’, ‘deep web’ and ‘closed peer sharing’ and can critically assess the issues associated with the use of such services.

  • I can explain what app permissions are and can give some examples from the technology or services I use.

  • I can describe simple ways to increase privacy on apps and services that provide privacy settings.

I can assess how secure sites are that store my content and can identify appropriate sites to inform my choices (e.g. https, Verisign).

I can explain why it is essential to recognise and follow my future employer’s online security policy and protocols.

I can describe ways in which some online content targets people to gain money or information illegally; I can describe strategies to help me identify such content (e.g. scams, phishing)

I can explain how and assess when more secure use may require more advanced password management (e.g. dual-factor authentication, regular rolling, security questions, captcha, biometrics).

11 statements

12 statements

I can explain how to manage and report issues if I discover or suspect a device has been compromised or I (or someone I know) are the victim of a scam (e.g. phishing, identity theft, ransomware).

13 statements - couldn’t combine any